Another relief arm invited to 2017 Mets Spring Training who was effective last year in Binghamton. Mets were so happy with his performance that he was given a chance to make the team out of spring training for 2017. The pitcher has great stuff, but hasn’t been able to put it together as a starter, so they converted him to relief. His strikeouts jumped in 2016 after switching from starting to relief and he looks to be a possible future ‘pen piece.

(Photo by Scoopnest.com)

RHP Logan Taylor

R/R, 6’3″ 230 lbs, 12/13/1991 (25), Drafted in 2012 in the 11th round out of East Oklahoma State College

Year Age AgeDif Tm Lev ERA G GS GF SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
2012 20 -1.2 Brooklyn A- 0.93 13 0 6 0 19.1 11 3 2 0 2 19 0.672
2013 21 -0.7 Savannah A 2.67 7 7 0 0 30.1 28 10 9 0 9 35 1.220
2014 22 0.6 2 Teams A-Rk 2.37 11 11 0 0 64.2 55 21 17 7 16 55 1.098
2014 22 1.6 Mets Rk 1.12 3 3 0 0 16.0 14 2 2 0 2 16 1.000
2014 22 0.3 Savannah A 2.77 8 8 0 0 48.2 41 19 15 7 14 39 1.130
2015 23 0.1 St. Lucie A+ 3.69 24 22 0 0 136.2 127 68 56 8 55 98 1.332
2016 24 -0.5 Binghamton AA 3.99 44 5 11 0 85.2 85 42 38 5 39 99 1.447

A college pick from East Oklahoma State College, picked in the 11th round in 2012, Taylor has a nice arsenal that he can rely on as a pitcher. The year after his draft, JD Sussman of Fangraphs raved about the pitcher, thinking he was going to be an underrated arm. The Mets usually try as many arms as they can as starters early on, until they prove that they can’t start anymore. Taylor was definitely one of those types with the ability to start and did well as a starter up until Binghamton. As a starter, he started to gain fatigue later into games, and started to walk players more. In his full season in St. Lucie, Taylor threw 136.2 innings and his walk rate started to climb to 3.6.

The next season, Taylor became a swingman and started and relieved for the BMets, but didn’t last very long in his starts, averaging 3 innings, and walking nine in 15 overall innings. While he wasn’t exactly effective as a reliever, giving up 100 total baserunners in 70 innings (70 hits, 30 walks), he also struck out 84, giving promise on the arm.

Taylor’s fastball is in the 90 to 94 range, touching 95 at times with some nice movement. He has a nice thick frame with a loose arm and full arm action, and has an over the top arm slot that is quick towards home. Taylor doesn’t throw with much of a windup. His breaking balls are pretty good, as he has a nice downer curveball that has 12 to 6 movement, and a hard 83-85 slider that has a bit of lateral movement, but not much depth. One of the reasons he didn’t remain a starter is that his delivery was always very high-effort, with a violent head jerk and arm stress.

Nevertheless, we will see Taylor in March, working some relief games for the Mets in big league camp and likely in Vegas in 2017.

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